UPDATED POST: 07/30/15

I’ve converted all of the art for Space Ace into animated gifs and created Mac and PC based tools to convert the GIFs into Iigs format data.

The tools are built against Burgerlib and the 65816 code is built with a modified version of a65816. Both Burgerlib and a65816 will be updated on github

Just in time for KansasFest, Rebecca Heineman has released the source code to ReadySoft’s Space Ace via Github. Rebecca’s announcement is pasted below:

In 1990, ReadySoft released Space Ace for the Apple IIgs. I purchased a copy and was appalled that the port was only for ProDOS and required you to play the game on floppy disks. Being the reverse engineering nutcase I was, I promptly disassembled the game and converted it back into source code. I then re-wrote the game to use the Apple IIgs hard disk and updated all the file manager code to GS/OS. After creating a really horrible icon for the game, I then uploaded my new application file to friends who wanted to play Space Ace on their hard drives and then promptly forgot about this port.

Here it is, 2015, and after searching my archive CDs, I found this source and decided to share it with you, the programming public, so you can get a glimpse of what 65816 code looked like for the Apple IIgs. This code ACTUALLY COMPILES AND RUNS using the Brutal Deluxe a65816 assembler and my python based build scripts. I’ve successfully built this on my Mac and ran the executable using Sweet16 and in Windows with Kegs. I’ve included the build tools and its source and exes for Mac (Intel/PPC) and Windows.

In case you’re wondering, yes, I did do this port just because I wanted it running natively on my Apple IIgs hard drive. Yes, I’m insane.



And one more thing…

The intellectual property of Space Ace is the exclusive property of Don Bluth and Digital Leisure. No transfer of the intellectual property of Space Ace or any transfer of the ownership of the sounds, art or other game assets are given nor implied. If anyone wishes to release a version of Space Ace for the Apple IIgs commercially, (I have absolutely no idea why? You’d sell like, what? 3 copies?) contact Digital Leisure for a license.

The source code… Go for it.

Rebecca Ann Heineman
Olde Skuul
Seattle, WA