August 25th, 2014

Will there be a Carte Blanche 2?

That’s the question now being discussed on Usenet forum Comp.Sys.Apple2 right now. The new Carte Blanche would offer several improvements over the original, of which built-in VGA or HDMI output and new video modes may be possibilities. If this is something you might be interested in, drop in to CSA2 and voice your support. It sounds like orders may be opening soon.


CB2

July 26th, 2014

KansasFest Day 3

MORE LINKS WILL ADDED LATER

Andre Lozano greeted early risers with the first session of the day. Andre was part of the group that restored disks from the collection of Chris Marker, a French film director, writer and early pioneer in multimedia computing and authoring. Chris was interested in how computers and humans interacted emotionally (something retro-computists can easily identify with). He developed a program called ‘Dialector’ that explored these emotional responses which were similar in concept to the famous ELIZA program and it’s variants.

If you haven’t seen Jason Scott in person, it should be something on your short ‘to-do’ list; he’s like a Kung-Fu kick to the psyche (but in a good way). Jason is a natural and entertaining speaker with a passion for his work with the Internet Archive. He’s been busy JSMESS emulation project (try it, you’ll be floored), in addition to scanning of magazines, books and disks from all sources retrocomputing. Jason shared some good news, apparently museums, other archival organizations (and even copyright holders like Atari) are waking up to the need to preserve and protect our digital history and are supporting projects like the Internet Archive. Perceptions are changing; it’s no longer a matter of digital piracy, but of digital preservation.

Ken Gagne announced that Juiced.GS continues to thrive as the last, and longest running Apple II print magazine ever. Publishing will continue into 2015 at the same rates as before! Also announced, some money-saving bundles for digital copies of back issues. See site for details.

Ch-ch-ch-changes to the schedule created an opportunity for an impromptu but very productive programmers roundtable event.

Charles Mangin and friend then gave us a tutorial on the various types of 3D printing that are available. During the session, he produced a few key caps as practical examples of what can be achieved for the retrocomputing hobbyist.

Next up, Quinn Dunki discussed her personal journey of discovery with ‘Veronica’, a homebrew 6502 based computer she built from scratch. Quinn put in about 5 years of work designing circuits and PCB’s as a learning exercise reminiscent of Steve Wozniak’s Apple 1 endeavor. You can read about on Quinn’s blog.

Michael Sternberg next demonstrated how Sir-Tech’s ‘STAR SAGA: ONE, Beyond the Boundary’ can be played over the internet using the VASSAL Engine. According to it’s site, ‘Vassal is a game engine for building and playing online adaptations of board games and card games. Play live on the Internet or by email. Vassal runs on all (modern) platforms, and is free, open-source software.’ Wow, I didn’t know this existed and it’s very cool. I can’t wait to try it out.

Pizza happened next, which was a much appreciated, welcome break from the yucky, uninspired, tasteless (and occasionally mysterious) food we’ve been getting from the cafeteria. Wow Rockhurst, we LOVE you, but the food has been disappointing this year. I think I lost weight just by looking at what was on my plate. Thanks?

The evening’s activities wrapped up with the annual group photo, best wacky tie (hey, I won!) contest and a few late evening sessions.

We have more than a few Podcasters present this year. I saw them massed around a microphone recording a joint podcast. I’m looking forward to that podcast — it should be interesting.

David Schmenk demo’d Apple II Pi (because he still gets asked ‘what is it?’).

Anthony Martino announced the upcoming A2Pi 6.5 card (with numerous improvements). We hope to have pics and a press release for that soon.

Lastly, Tony Diaz led a class on repairing floppy disk drives. Attendees were free to bring their malfunctioning drives for diagnostics and repair, because if Tony can’t fix it, probably no one else can.

Wow it’s late. I’m tired but staying up late tonight. I’ve managed to return 3 Transwarp GS boards from my personal collection back to the community so far. I’m using the proceeds to fund additional Garage Giveaways, recoup shipping expenses, etc. I’m probably going to list a few more on eBay before long.

Tomorrow, I’ll probably sleep in. Saturday is the last official day of KansasFest and I can’t tell if we’re winding up or winding down. One thing is for certain, this has been a great year.

July 26th, 2014

Michael Sternberg’s A2MP3-Xfer

We totally missed this during RetroChallenge Winter Warmup 2014. Luckily, we caught up with Michael Sternberg during KansasFest for a demo. Checkout his disk/image transfer program for the Apple II using Vince Briel’s A2MP3 adapter.


Michael wrote A2MP3-Xfer has a proof of concept, so it’s rather limited (DOS 3.3, DSK images only). The source code is available on BitBucket for download and Michael encourages anyone interested to check it out and expand upon his work if they’re interested.

Manuals for programming and technical specifications are still available.

May 19th, 2014

Do you want 16MB of auxillary RAM in your Apple IIe?

The real question is, ‘what would you do with 16 megabytes of auxiliary RAM?’ Well, there’s AppleWorks (but it only recognizes 1.5MB) and only a few other programs like SuperCalc that can adequately justify adding more than 1MB of RAM to your Apple IIe. Sure, you can also add a print spooler and a RAM disk but then, what’s next?

We’re about to find out. Matt Jenkins is close to turning his prototype RamWorks clone, dubbed ‘ScramWorks’ into an actual card. Initially, Matt looked at an 8MB version, but it’s just as easy and with little increase in cost to max out the card for the ultimate 16MB auxiliary card.

During their early years, Applied Engineering advertised memory add-on cards for the RamWorks line totaling between 14MB to 16MB (achieved by stacking multiple expanders), digital and analog video adapters and even optimistically developed a 65c816 option card, perhaps in the hope of spurring 16 bit development on the Apple II line. By the time the RamWorks II and III were introduced, AE had reduced their advertising claims to 3MB and the 16bit option card was a gizmo that little to nothing took advantage of. That was then.

So what’s new and different today? Honestly, very little. Matt is looking into making the card compatible with the older AE RGB interfaces, or more likely, integrate Nishida Radio’s VGA adapter into the design. That would certainly be practical.

It would be up to today’s hackers and enthusiasts to develop the killer apps or utilities to make 16MB of RAM dance on the Apple IIe. I will buy one (or two) in the hopes someone will do exactly that.

If you’re interested in the ScramWorks project, let Matt know. He has a survey up to gather information on what the community needs and expects.

May 2nd, 2014

Apple II case for your Raspberry Pi

Charles Mangin sure has been having fun with his 3D printer.  Last month, his SD card reader disguised as a Disk II drive made waves in the community and now he’s followed it up with this totally awesome thing:




Yes, it’s a Raspberry Pi case designed to look like an Apple IIe.  Mangin explains:

Each case is 3D printed in SLA (at Shapeways) from 3D models based on my actual Apple II collection. Then, each part is painted to match the original beige, brown or platinum grey – or Black, if you prefer the Bell & Howell model. I also include all the hardware you will need to connect your Pi to power and video – just add Pi.

The case is currently available to order on the RetroConnector Etsy shop for US $115 + shipping.

April 23rd, 2014

Vicious, an Apple-1 sound card

Well here is a surprise! A sound card for the Apple-1, based on SID and CIA chips you’d normally expect to see on some other vintage computer platform.

January 28th, 2014

Mike Willegal to lead ‘BYO SwyftCard’ workshop at VCF East 9.1

EDIT: Mike wrote in to clarify that he’s custom making a reproduction of the SwyftCard and that it won’t be based on his SuperProto hack. Given Mike’s eye for detail, it’s going to be every bit as good as the real thing.

Good news for SwyftCard enthusiasts, Mike Willegal has implemented the SwyftCard using his SuperProto board. In addition, he will be offering a workshop to build a reproduction SwyftCard during VCF East 9.1, April 4th-6th at the InfoAge Science Center in Wall, New Jersey.

The SwyftCard is the brainchild of Jef Raskin, who started the Macintosh project while at Apple. They’re relatively hard to find and some enthusiasts consider them collectible, along with it’s successor the Canon Cat. Mike has a nice write-up of the SwyftCard here.

December 10th, 2013

Apple2Pi refinements continue to impress early adopters

Via David Schmenk

“Stealth IIGS (IIgs in IIe case w/ CFFA3000, Uthernet) vs Apple II PI (Stock IIe w/ mouse card and A2Pi adapter) running GSport with Uthernet emulation at 2.8 MHz. Both using the Internet Starter Kit GS/OS image. Can you tell which is which?”

December 2nd, 2013

Payton Byrd announces Hayesduino

Via comp.sys.apple2

What Is It?

Hayesduino is an Arduino sketch that provides a bridge between the world of the Internet and small devices that do not have built-in ethernet capabilities. Old computers, such as the Commodore 64, Apple II and Atari 800 have serial ports, but do not have readily available Internet solutions with wide software support. While specialized solutions do exist for these platforms, they all require specialized software to use them and do not lend themselves to more general usage such as simply opening a socket, sending some data, and/or receiving some data.

Hayesduino bridges this gap by emulating a Hayes compatible modem. This allows users to initiate Internet communications via sockets that are opened by “dialing” to a hostname and port. An example would be initiating a telnet session with a host by simply typing atdt hostname:23 and waiting for the host to respond. Using this technique, any online socket can be reached and communicated with.

Hayesduino could have accomplished this without emulating a modem, but there needed to be a good way to allow the small machine to receive incoming connections. The three platforms listed above were all very popular systems for hosting BBS (bulletin board systems) which would accept calls over a telephone line via modem. Hayesduino simulates the incoming phone call whenever the software receives an inbound connection on port 23 (this is changeable in the code). When an incoming connection is detected, the Hayesduino will toggle the DCE-DCD line to trigger the remote software to answer the incoming “call”. In this way a classic BBS can be hooked up directly to the Internet.

https://hayesduino.codeplex.com/

December 1st, 2013

Nishida Radio releases UNISDISK Disk II/Smartport drive emulator

Nishida Radio has released the UNISDISK, a Disk II/Smartport disk emulator for the Apple II series. You can read more about at http://tulip-house.ddo.jp/DIGITAL/UNISDISK/english.html

I’m traveling right now and will post additional details later after I get home.


unisdisk

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