August 27th, 2018

BrutalDeluxe announces Graffidisk

From Antoine Vignau’s post at comp.sys.apple2 on August 17:

Graffidisk is a new kind of software for the Apple II. Its limit is your imagination: enter text or draw a GR picture on your Apple II and let Graffidisk tag your 5.25″ floppy disks. See the results of your piece of art with John Morris’ Applesauce. Share with your friends!

You can check it out here.

July 26th, 2018

Juiced.GS to publish in 2019; more Concentrate PDFs

Juiced.GS, the world's last and longest-running Apple II print publication, will publish its two-dozenth volume (issues #93–96) in 2019.

2019 subscriptions and renewals are available immediately. Customers who have previously purchased a subscription that automatically renews need to do nothing; their accounts will be charged on January 1. (An active subscription status can be verified by logging into one's online account.)

Apple II enthusiasts who are curious about Juiced.GS can subscribe to the email newsletter to receive a new, free sample issue with 20 pages of content from the past five years of the magazine.

Additionally, Juiced.GS has released five new PDFs of themed content, previously available in hardcopy only:

  • BBS: Here's everything you need to know about connecting to a telnet bulletin board system or even running your own, as well as a review of the WiModem232. It also includes a review of BBS: The Documentary and an interview with its creator, Jason Scott.
  • Education: The Apple II gained much of its fame in the classroom, where its effects can still be felt. This PDF is a reflection on the Apple II's longevity in the classroom and how modern students respond to such classics as The Oregon Trail and VisiCalc, as well as how the Raspberry Pi might serve as a modern equivalent for teaching programming.
  • Raspberry Pi: This affordable microcomputer makes an excellent Apple II peripheral. An introduction to A2SERVER, a review of the Apple II Pi, how to use the Pi to run a BBS, and what today's students could learn from the Pi round out this PDF.
  • Apple-1: The precursor to the Apple II, the Apple-1 is also alive and well. From replica models to soldering experiences to convention appearances, the Apple-1 is everywhere in this Concentrate.
  • The Oregon Trail: The seminal edutainment title has seen multiple adaptations over the years. This PDF reviews a theatrical play, a handheld game, and a card game; examines how today's students interpret Oregon Trail; and also goes behind the scenes of Melissa Barron's hack, 73H 0r3g0n 7r41L.

These files are available immediately starting at $5, with more PDFs to come later in 2018.

July 4th, 2018

Marinetti 3.0b9 is now available

A new version of Marinetti, the implementation of TCP/IP for the Apple IIgs, is now publicly available.

The previous public announcement of a release of Marinetti was 3.0b3 in 2006. Since then there have been several bug fix versions that have not been made widely available. In 2014, the then-latest build, 3.0b8, was made available to Uthernet owners. That version included some debug code that was left in the build to assist with bug reporting. This latest release removes that debug code to improve performance. There are no other functional changes. While this software is still officially classed as ‘beta’ software, it has been extensively tested. It is highly recommended that existing users of 3.0b3 and 3.0b8 upgrade to this version.

Marinetti 3.0b9 can be downloaded from the Marinetti homepage, or the a2RetroSystems website where it is available as a disk image that can be mounted in an emulator or a disk emulation device like the CFFA. The disk image includes the original Marinetti 3.0b1 installer for new installations if necessary and a replacement Init which contains the latest changes. Ewen Wannop’s latest Uthernet link layers are also provided.

Marinetti was originally written by Richard Bennett in 1996 and was subsequently released as an open-source project. It is now maintained by members of the Marinetti Open Source Project, which is hosted on SourceForge.

 

June 27th, 2018

Juiced.GS Volume 23, Issue 2 now available

Juiced.GS Volume 23, Issue 2 (Jun 2018)Volume 23, Issue 2 (Jun 2018) of Juiced.GS, the longest-running Apple II publication in print, has now shipped.

In this issue, researchers from Princeton University present the Information Barrier eXperimental II — original Apple II software and hardware used for nuclear warhead verification. Also in this issue is a review of Oregon Trail: The Play! and an interview with its playwright; reviews of two graphic novels about Steve Jobs; a tutorial for procuring and digitizing academic dissertations about the Apple II; how Microsoft’s purchase of GitHub will affect Apple II programmers; and much, much more!

This is Juiced.GS‘s second quarterly issue of 2018, its twenty-third year in print. Subscriptions for 2018 are available for $19 each for United States customers, $24 for readers in Canada and Mexico, and $27 for international customers.

May 24th, 2018

A2osX: Multi-Tasking OS for Apple II goes v0.9.1

Rémy Gibert, the author of A2osX, a now preemptive multi-tasking OS for the Apple II, announces the release of v0.9.1. Rémy is also looking for contributors.

If you believe you could help, please visit https://github.com/burniouf/A2osX

Announcement:

Kernel 0.9.1 is now preemptive. All you need is a “tick” source, see below for supported hardware. For now, only SBIN/BIN executables are “switcheable”.

Roadmap is as follow:
Check all BIN/SBIN sources to make them preemptive compliant, most of them are NOT.
Add a way to make LIB also interruptible and reentrant.
Add more supported hardware for system clock.
…and still hoping finding few contributors…. :-(

March 30th, 2018

Juiced.GS Volume 23, Issue 1 now available

Juiced.GS Volume 23, Issue 1 (Mar 2018)Volume 23, Issue 1 (Mar 2018) of Juiced.GS, the longest-running Apple II publication in print, has now shipped.

This issue features reviews of the WiModem232 modem emulator and the Oregon Trail electronic handheld; Quinn Dunki’s tutorial for using git and GitHub version control with Apple II source code; an interview with Robert Freedman of HLS Duplication; coverage of the inaugural Vintage Computer Festival Pacific Northwest; a day in the life of an Apple II detective; and much, much more!

This is Juiced.GS‘s first quarterly issue of 2018, its twenty-third year in print. Subscriptions for 2018 are available for $19 each for United States customers, $24 for readers in Canada and Mexico, and $27 for international customers.

January 18th, 2018

Announcing ProDOS 2.4.2 for all Apple II computers

Via Callapple.org at http://www.callapple.org/vintage-apple-computers/apple-ii/announcing-prodos-2-4-2-for-all-apple-ii-computers/, thanks to John Brooks:

ProDOS 2.4.2 is a minor release with bug fixes and updates. It replaces ProDOS 2.4 and ProDOS 2.4.1.

Bugs fixed:
1. If a directory with more than 255 files was used, and then a different disk was used, a Bad Dir Error $51 was reported.
2. Bitsy Bye was not compatible with the Appletalk Workstation card.
3. Bitsy Bye was not compatible with the Mac LC Apple IIe card.

Updates:

1. Thunderclock driver is updated for years 2018 – 2023
2. ADT Pro v2.0.2
3. Copy II Plus v8.4
4. Added Cat Doctor’s extended utilities

If you’d like to help develop or test future versions, please contact me.
Enjoy.
-JB
John Brooks
Twitter: @JBrooksBSI

Download Disk Image: ProDOS_2_4_2.DSK

If you’d like to support John’s efforts to improve the Apple II, donations are welcome through Paypal

January 17th, 2018

PLASMA Developer Preview 1.0 available

David Schmenk has just released v1.0 of the developer preview of PLASMA.

Modern Retroprogramming on the Apple II. When was the last time you programmed a modern language on a 40 year old computer? Now is your chance. PLASMA is a combination of operating environment, virtual machine, and assembler/compiler matched closely to the 6502 architecture.

Check out the Release Notes for details: https://github.com/dschmenk/PLASMA/blob/master/doc/Preview%20Version%201.0.md

January 3rd, 2018

Virtual ][ v8.0 goes 64-bit

Thanks to a message posted by David Finnigan on comp.emulators.apple2, please note that Gerard Putter has just released v8.0 of his Apple II emulator for Mac OS.

 

For more information, please visit virtualii.com
 

This version contains extensive behind-the-scenes updates and rewrites to remain compatible with new versions of macOS, forming a basis for further future development.
For example, the application was still 32-bit; as of this release it is a 64-bit app, making it compatible with modern Mac APIs, improved memory management, etc.

Although I tested the app thoroughly, I might have inadvertently introduced new bugs due to the extensive changes. If you find any, let me know.

Furthermore:

  • A disk image file can now be double-clicked in the Finder to start a virtual machine with that disk inserted.
  • Added the feature to speak the text on the Apple II screen, using the Mac voice synthesizer.
  • Fixed an issue that could cause a new virtual machine window to appear with a very small size.
  • Fixed an issue that caused the Inspector’s disassembly to show empty lines when scrolled.
  • Rewrote the “movie making” feature to use the AVFoundation framework. When running macOS 10.13 (High Sierra) or later, the movie is written using the HEVC codec. Older system use the H264 codec.
  • Clarified the section in the Help file on game controller setup.
  • Removed the option to select a folder where the ROM files are located. This feature often caused confusion, and led to some tricky problems. You can however still select a specific ROM file for a virtual machine. If you don’t specify such a file, the app will search for a matching ROM file in one of the standard locations.
  • The app now submits crashes or similar app issues to the developer. These reports are fully anonymous, and help improving the app. If you wish you can disable it in the application preferences.
December 23rd, 2017

Juiced.GS Volume 22, Issue 4 now available

Juiced.GS Volume 22, Issue 4 (Dec 2017)Volume 22, Issue 4 (Dec 2017) of Juiced.GS, the longest-running Apple II publication in print, has now shipped.

This issue features reviews of a2heaven’s FASTChip //e accelerator card, the Game Port Interface Board, and the book Break Out; tutorials for expanding Applesoft BASIC by creating your own ampersand commands, and for activating the Apple III’s "Satan Mode"; a look at how Kelvin Sherlock ported the ProLine BBS software to a cloud-based telnet service; and much, much more!

This is Juiced.GS‘s fourth quarterly issue of 2017, its twenty-second year in print. The complete 2017 volume is now available as a bundle for only $16. Subscriptions for 2018 are now being accepted and are $19 each for United States customers, $24 for readers in Canada and Mexico, and $27 for international customers.

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