June 1st, 2017

Golden Gate compatibility layer by Kelvin Sherlock now available from Juiced.GS

Gamebits, the publisher of Apple II magazine Juiced.GS, announces its partnership with software developer Kelvin Sherlock to distribute his newest product. Golden Gate is a compatibility layer that allows modern computers to run ORCA and GNO/ME shell programs as if they were native. With Golden Gate, programmers can engage in cross-platform development of Apple IIgs applications in an IDE such as Xcode, or any other Windows, macOS, or Linux text editor.

"I’m excited to work with Juiced.GS to bring modern development amenities to the Apple II," said Sherlock. "Gamebits demonstrated its commitment to supporting Apple II programmers when it made The Byte Works’ Opus products available. Carrying Golden Gate in the same store was a natural fit."

"Juiced.GS has been covering Apple II software development for over two decades," said Ken Gagne, the magazine’s editor and publisher. "It’s an honor for us to share the tools for developing the next generation of software. I look forward to featuring Golden Gate-developed tools in future issues of Juiced.GS!"

Golden Gate is available immediately for $10 and includes macOS and Windows installers, documentation, source code, and future updates. Read Sherlock’s behind-the-scenes look at the development of Golden Gate in the June 2017 issue of Juiced.GS.


Kelvin Sherlock is the creator of many games and utilities for multiple operating systems, including GShisen, Silver Platter, and PNG Floyd for the Apple IIgs; Shrink-Fit X and ProFUSE for Mac OS X; and iShisen for iOS. Learn more about Golden Gate at Sherlock’s website.

Juiced.GS is the longest-running and last remaining print publication dedicated to the Apple II. Subscriptions are available at $19 for United States customers, $24 for readers in Canada and Mexico, and $27 for international customers. Receive news and updates about Juiced.GS by signing up for our email list or following us on Facebook or Google+.

January 11th, 2017

Portal for the Apple II – A Cake-acquisition Simulator

Vince Weaver has written an Applesoft rendition of Portal for the Apple II.

“While attempting to travel to the future to get a copy of Portal 3. I accidentally traveled to alternate-1987 and obtained a copy of Portal 1 for the Apple II!”, Weaver says.

“In actuality I originally just planned to do the end credits. But the Apple II high-res mode has the perfect Aperture Science orange and blue colors, and one thing led to another… ”

Of course this project is just for fun and is in no way endorsed by Valve, etc.

Check out the Kerbal Space Program port by Vince as well!

January 2nd, 2017

The Source Is Strong With This One – System 6.0.4.

Happy II Year!

A New, New Release.

But first I would like to address the auxtypo, er auxtype issue recently discovered with the 6.0.3. release. Sometimes there are many ways to accomplish the same task. Most of the time it matters not how it is done so we don’t think about it. The auxtype issue has brought to the forefront that just as elusive as issues are with the GS/OS HFS FST, the same can be said about the ProDOS File System Extension for MacOS Classic (7.x-9.x). There is an apparent endian issue with the handling of the auxtype. Given the limited use of auxtypes in the ProDOS world, with most being $0000, if there is an endian issue the result is going to be the same anyway. But when you have an intermittent error and a whole lot of files to copy, your odds of it stumbling are much greater. In light of the HFS FST’s issues, I typically tell people to move data onto it’s native file system on the target platform. Don’t write HFS disks with your IIgs. After all these years I guess I need to add “..and don’t write ProDOS disks with your Mac.

The root of the issue was the auxtype bytes being swapped during the transfer. In the case of the SCSI.Manager it should have been $0140 but instead it was written as $4001. All auxtypes have been verified with this release.

Overall, there were auxtype issues with several files but not all affected the operation of the system software.
(SCSI.Manager, Finder, Start, and all system sounds.)

Some of this stuff is technical in nature and therefore dull and boring to most people, but we’ll go over it because if not, someone will ask.

OMF Records

OMF record packing. Records are stored more efficiently than the loader in System 6.0 and earlier resulting in less disk space for most program files and improved load times.

Control Panels

Support for Daylight Saving Time has been revised to the USA standard effective year 2007, up from the 1987-2006 specification used on the 6.0.3 and earlier releases.

Each CDEV has an rVersion resource for consistency.

Sound CDEV handles finderSaysOpenFailed events by playing the sound resource in the file. This is just the option to associate additional error conditions with audio feedback.

For the Unicorns out there, Slots CDEV supports ROM 4 “Mark Twain” hardware. Since this revision has inbuilt SCSI hardware and support for the SuperDrive (FDHD) 1.44mb 3.5″, these changes are now selectable and with the lack of Slots 5 and 7 physically, there is no “Your Card” option that can be selected.

File System Translators

DOS 3.3, Pascal, and ProDOS FSTs have been corrected to use the maximum Parameter Count (pCount) values. These are one way of passing variables between sections of code.

Pascal FST checks that the Volume Control Record is actually a Pascal Volume Control Record, that all parameters were properly initialized.

Finder

When opening resource sound files with only a single rSound and no application is assigned to that file type, the Finder sends a finderSaysOpenFailed event. This lets the Sound CDEV play the sound (if no other system extension handles it first). Most sound files in the System:Sound folder can be played by the Finder.

File and volume sizes larger than one gigabyte, up to the maximum GS/OS allows, are properly displayed. Note that this is GS/OS support, and not ProDOS. Since GS/OS has open ended support for file systems other than Apple II native formats those files will be displayed properly in listings.

FST names in Finder windows no longer display garbage if a third party unknown FST is installed and used. Instead, no information is displayed.

Fonts and Sounds

Additional fonts are available: The installed group of fonts has been rounded out and all sets contain each character in each native point size.
Added Fonts:
Courier 48, 56, 72, and 96
Helvetica 56
Symbol 9, 10, 12, 14, 18, 24, 36, 40, 48, 56, 72, and 96
Times 56

Helvetica 96 and Times 96 have missing characters restored.

Various Macintosh system sounds have been added.

Installer

Installer sets the System folder’s auxtype during Easy Update to permanently enable magic routing in the Finder. This only works if the System folder is unlocked. Magic routing is when you’re installing things to the System Folder, you don’t need to open it and go to the respective folder. Files will be placed according to their filetype.

New fonts and sounds can also be added through the Customize options “Fonts: All” and “Control Panel: Sounds” respectively.

Line Edit Tool

Line Edit control supports Control-A to jump to the start of the line and control-E to jump to the end of the line.

ProDOS 8

ProDOS 8 2.4.1 release from John Brooks is included.

Window Manager Tool

When JM Gothic is the System Font, the Window Manager uses JM Gothic instead of the hard-coded Shaston 8.

Apple II Technical Notes Apple IIgs #001 and GS/OS #100 have been updated to reflect the content and organizational changes in this release.

Click for Availability…

January 1st, 2017

Phoenix Software text adventure source code released

The source code for three text adventures from Phoenix Software has been released by the original programmer, Paul Berker. Adventure in Time (1981), Birth of the Phoenix (1981), and Queen of Phobos (1982) were published for both Apple II and Atari, with source code for both platforms now available from the AtariAge forum.

These releases were coordinated by Kevin Savetz, co-host of the ANTIC podcast. His interview with Berker was released on Nov 19, 2016, as episode #254 of ANTIC.

September 7th, 2016

VNCView GS updated to v1.0

Stephen Heumann has updated VNCView GS to v1.0. The update includes optimized raw pixel decoding routines, meaning raw pixels can be decoded and displayed incrementally while receiving data and there is now an added option to tune Marinetti for high throughput.

This software allows an Apple IIgs to connect over a network to any computer providing VNC services, to display and interact with that computer’s graphical desktop environment.

July 26th, 2016

KansasFest 2016 HackFest videos and downloads




Rob McMullen
Omnivore
Jumpman Level Editor

Jeremy Rand
Bejeweled Project Page
Bejeweled Bootable Disk Image

Kevin Savetz
Kaverns of KFest Project Page
Kaverns Bootable Disk Image

Paul Hagstrom
WavyDots Project Page

July 26th, 2016

4am releases Passport, automated copying tool


Passport

Passport is a verification program for 5.25-inch Apple II floppy disks. It can verify all unprotected disks and many copy-protected disks. It can also create a copy of the original disks in a standard 16-sector format, and optionally apply patches to the copy to help make the copy work properly.

BOOM!

Jeremy Barr-Hyde is already using Passport. Check out his excellent blog post documenting his archival workflow for backing up protected diskettes.

https://jbretro.wordpress.com/2016/07/25/passportby4am-jbhworkflow/”

July 25th, 2016

Call-A.P.P.L.E. releases updated books for KansasFest

Try using checkout code LULU30 or SHIPSAVE16.


Monitor_Peeled

Press Release:

Seattle, Washington — July 22, 2016 — Apple Pugetsound Program Library Exchange (A.P.P.L.E.) is proud to announce the immediate availability of the classic book The Apple II Monitor Peeled.

Last published by A.P.P.L.E. in 1979, this release returns the book to print and for the first time in Hardcover. Writing programs for an Apple II computer is simplified by having a useful reference for the Apple II Monitor that describes how to make use of a particular feature. The Apple II Monitor Peeled examines the Apple II Monitor and ROM address range $F800~$FFFF, and provides a useful reference for Peeks, Pokes, and Calls.

Features

• Restored pages and a new back cover.
• Back in print for the first time since 1979.
• Available in Softcover and Hardcover for the first time.
• Peeks, Pokes, and Calls organized by topic.
• Memory Locations in Hex and Decimal fully described.
• ROM contents of the Apple II described and organized by subject.
• Keyboard Input, Text Output, and Screen Format routines.
• Machine Language program development aids.
• Beneficial for Machine Language and BASIC programmers.

Pricing

The Apple II Monitor Peeled is available in Softcover for $19.95 and Hardcover for $29.95 through the Lulu bookstore.


WWA2

Press Release:

Seattle, Washington — July 22, 2016 — Apple Pugetsound Program Library Exchange (A.P.P.L.E.) is proud to announce the immediate availability of the book What’s Where in the Apple – Enhanced Edition: A Complete Guide to the Apple II Computer.

Produced in coordination with original publisher Robert Tripp and last published in 1984, this new Enhanced Edition is the most complete and accurate edition ever created, featuring improved readability, new coverage of the Apple IIe and Apple IIc, and a forward and historical perspective by Robert Tripp.

A comprehensive guide to the hardware and firmware organization and architecture of the Apple II computer, What’s Where in the Apple discusses concepts and programming techniques useful for mastering the inner workings and hidden mechanisms of the Apple II.

The numerical Atlas and alphabetical Gazetteer guide you to over 2,700 memory locations of PEEKs, POKEs, and CALLs in DOS and ProDOS. The names and locations of various Monitor, DOS, Integer BASIC, and Applesoft routines are listed, and information is provided on their use.

Applesoft and Integer BASIC users will learn how to speed up and streamline programs. Assembly language users will discover routines that simplify coding and interfacing. All users will find this book helpful to understand the Apple II and essential for mastering it!

Features

• The definitive guide to the Apple II computer.
• New Forward and The Evolution of WWA by original publisher Robert Tripp.
• Article by William F. Luebbert about WWA that originally appeared in MICRO.
• All Apple IIe and Apple IIc models are covered for the first time in two Chapters and the Atlas/Gazetteer.
• More new features include: Chapter 1 describing Apple computer models, Appendices, Glossary, and Index.
• With over 4,000 hours of editing, restoration, formatting, and new features, this new Enhanced Edition is the most complete and accurate edition ever created.
• 23 Chapters encompassing a comprehensive guide to the hardware and firmware organization and architecture of the Apple II computer to help BASIC and Assembly language programmers through clear tutorials and examples.
• Over 2,700 memory locations of PEEKs, POKEs, and CALLs in DOS and ProDOS, detailing routines and use.
• All complete programs in the book are available on an Apple II DSK image.
• Almost 600 pages.
• Introduced and produced by two long-time Apple historians, Brian Wiser and Bill Martens.

Pricing

What’s Where in the Apple – Enhanced Edition is available in Softcover for $49.98 and Hardcover for $69.95 through the Lulu bookstore.

July 21st, 2016

Lawless Legends Team produces Ancient Legends Game


Ancient_Legends

Click picture to redirect to Ancient Legends download page.

July 8th, 2016

Space 4048

AppleIIGSMarc posted to comp.sys.apple2 about a game he’s working on. Looks good!

Hey everyone, I just wanted to share with you a small preview of a game I’ve been working on. It’s a lo-res, vertically scrolling shooter that will run on any 48k Apple II. Yes, the graphics are extremely blocky and a bit ugly, but I thought it’d be a fun way to learn 6502 assembly on the Apple II. It’s not quite ready for release, but when it’s done I’ll make it available to anyone interested.

Oh, and if you watch the video, I recommend keeping the size small as it’s easier on the eyes. I know this isn’t Game of the Year material, so please be kind! :)



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