June 27th, 2014

Juiced.GS Volume 19, Issue 2 now available

Juiced.GS Volume 19, Issue 2 (Jun 2014)Volume 19, Issue 2 (June 2014) of Juiced.GS, the longest-running Apple II publication in print, has been mailed to all subscribers. This issue features a celebration of the BASIC programming language’s fiftieth birthday; an interview with programmer Ron Graff; Charles Mangin’s introduction to using 3D printers to create Apple II parts; a behind-the-scenes look at how ADTPro accomplishes bootstrapping; reviews of the book Vintage Game Consoles and the chiptune documentaries Reformat the Planet and Europe in 8 Bits; and much, much more!

This is Juiced.GS‘s second quarterly issue of 2014. Subscriptions are available at $19 for United States customers, $24 for readers in Canada and Mexico, and $27 for international customers, with several free sample issues available as PDFs.

June 26th, 2014

Vince Briel to host BIY workshop at KansasFest 2014

KansasFest attendees are in for a special treat this year. Vince Briel is attending and will once again host a ‘build it yourself’ workshop. You can sign up to assemble any of his famous kits, including the brand new Ohio Scientific Superboard III (another famous 6502-based micro).

Complete details are on the Briel Computers web site.

June 23rd, 2014

GSport 0.31 released

The GSport team has announced a new release with significant improvements! Below is David Schmidt’s posting via CSA2.

The GSport team has been busy lately. Peter Neubauer’s AppleTalk emulation is the star of this release – making GSport the only modern emulator with this capability. Christopher Mason enhanced printer emulation capabilities further with a virtual ImageWriter II or LQ in slot 1. Several other items and fixes are aggregated as well.

GSport is a derivative of Kent Dickey’s KEGS Apple IIgs emulator.

Version 0.31 – 6/22/2014

New functionality:

  • Added AppleTalk networking emulation with bridging to EtherTalk (See: http://gsport.sourceforge.net/appletalk.html)
  • Added Imagewriter LQ printer emulation (more documentation coming – printing is highly configurable)
  • Added clipboard text paste capability (OSX, Windows)
  • Emulated serial ports are individually configurable as either IP or pass-through to real hardware ports
  • Apple II Pi build improvements

Bug fixes:

  • IN#1 and IN#2 now trigger the incoming IP port to listen when using IP simulated serial ports; previously, only PR#1 or PR#2 did
  • Fixed crash when parallel.rom is missing
  • Fix for real joysticks: unless the joystick is moving, GSport sets the values to zero
  • http://gsport.sourceforge.net

    (Followups set to comp.emulators.apple2)

June 11th, 2014

Lingerie for NakedOS revealed.

Daniel (Krue) Kruszyna has announced Lingerie, a ‘filer’ utility for Martin Hayes’ NakedOS, the fast and tiny OS for the Apple II.


lingerie

June 10th, 2014

AppleWin moves to GitHub

Update your bookmarks. Tom Charlesworth announced today that AppleWin (the leading 8-bit Apple II emulator for Windows) has moved to it’s new repository on GitHub.

Hi,

Berlios has finally been closed (for OSS hosting), meaning that the AppleWin project is no longer accessible on the Berlios site.

I have been gradually migrating AppleWin over to GitHub. The move still isn’t 100% complete, but IMO it’s good enough now so that I can announce it here.

The new project URL is:
https://github.com/AppleWin

Releases are here:
https://github.com/AppleWin/AppleWin/releases

Issues (bug, enhancements and questions) can be accessed and raised here:
https://github.com/AppleWin/AppleWin/issues?state=open

NB. All the old issues and features have been migrated over.

I’m am still getting up to speed on GitHub and git, so bear with me during this initial period.

Tom

June 6th, 2014

Dagen Brock releases Flapple Bird

Based on the maddening ‘Flappy Bird’ game, Dagen Brock has released a reproduction (or de-make) game for the Apple II dubbed ‘Flapple Bird’.

Download 5.25″ version
Download 3.5″ version


flapple_title

June 6th, 2014

The French Touch



Block ASCII art done right on the Apple II. Who needs ANSI?

June 5th, 2014

Option8 offers discount to KansasFest attendees

KansasFest Special:

Order any item for local pickup at KansasFest 2014, and receive 5% off your total order. Offer valid through July 4, 2014.

http://retroconnector.com/products/

June 5th, 2014

Introducing PLASMA 123 (1][///) Preview

Some of you may remember my earlier work on PLASMA, the Proto Language AsSeMbler for Apple. Some of you may even know it will be the language of Lawless Legends (https://www.facebook.com/LawlessLegends). But now, with a flurry of previous concepts and new ideas developed for the LL implementation, comes PLASMA 123. Why 123? Because it runs on the Apple 1, ][, and ///. “No way!”, you say. Way. And it runs the exact same PLASMA modules (user programs and libraries) on all three systems, without modification. That’s the power of a VM. But this VM was designed specifically for the Apple II (both 64K and 128K fully utilized) and the Apple /// (uses extended memory addressing, up to 512K), from the beginning. The Apple 1 got a quick port because of the awesome CFFA1 (Rich may still have some left).

Now this is a pretty early announcement, but I thought some of the more technically adventurous may want to take a look and provide some feedback, or at least poke at it. You can find all the source and preliminary documentation on GitHub: https://github.com/dschmenk/PLASMA

There is a demo disk image in the GitHub project: DEMO.0.9.PO – it is a dual booting disk for the Apple II and III. It will boot into a simple command line prompt. The commands are:

c – catalog current path
c – catalog path
v – list on-line device volumes
p – set prefix to path
+ – run PLASMA file
– run SYSTEM file (Apple II only)

There are only two sample PLASMA programs to run on this image: HELLO and TEST. Run them, as documented above, with ‘+hello’ and ‘+test’.

The HELLO module is pretty simple. The TEST module actually loads a module dependency, TESTLIB, as it runs. It is just my language test coverage module, using a bunch of different aspects of PLASMA. If you see a bunch of junk on the screen with HELLO on your Apple ][ or ][+, that means you don’t have a lower-case adapter and I haven’t forced the output on those machines to upper case yet.

So now we have the grand unifying environment for the 8 bit Apples. And it’s fast. I developed some new interpreter technology for this version: about 3 times slower than native compiled 6502, but about 10 times as dense, and code doesn’t take up precious main memory (on 128K Apple II or Apple III). You can still write ASM functions inside your PLASMA module for those times that speed is critical above all else.

Dave…

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